PS Rangiriri

The remains of the Rangiriri, a historic paddle steamer sit back from the Waikato River between Memorial Park and Parana Park.

Waikato River

Waikato River

The PS Rangiriri was commissioned by New Zealand’s colonial Government in 1864 for use on the Waikato River during the Land Wars.

The Rangiriri was never fitted with guns, but it did have a steel pipe, that was connected with the main boilers, that was fitted around the side. If an enemy tried to board the Rangiriri, a lever could be pulled and scolding steam would be released through holes in the pipe.

The scolding steam was never needed as the Rangiriri arrived too late and was never used during the Land Wars. It was instead used as a transport and supply vessel. It brought some of Hamilton’s earliest militia settlers to the city.

P.S. Rangiriri

P.S. Rangiriri

The Rangiriri was in Government service until it was sold to a private company in 1868. In 1889, the Rangiriri ran aground and spent the next 90 years abandoned in the river suffering damage from erosion and river silt. In 1981-82 it was raised from the river floor and left on the river bank.

In 2009 a preservation projection began. In March 2010 a civic cermony was held to mark the official ceremony. It is now sheltered by a canopy and fence around it to protect it from damage.

A viewing platform has been built for visitors to view the wreck.

Viewing platform over PS Rangiriri

Viewing platform over PS Rangiriri

Basic Facts:

Length: 90 feet  6 inches (27.5 metres)

Breadth: 20 feet (6.1 metres)

Draught: 2 feet 6 inches (76.2 cm)

Wheel diameter: 9 feet (2.74 metres)

Speed: 8.5 knots maximum. Cruising speed 6 knots.

Designed by James Stewart

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