Lake Mountain Alpine Resort, Victoria, Australia

Lake Mountain Alpine Resort is a mountain and ski resort in Victoria, Australia.

001

The Lake Mountain Alpine Resort is situated between Lake Mountain and Echo Flat, and is provides access to the Yarra Ranges National Park. The mountain is 1,433 metres (4,701 feet) high.

This ski resort is approximately 120 kilometres (75 miles) from Melbourne. As it is the closest snow resort from Melbourne it is a popular day trip for snow play, particularly for families.

There are many activities to partake at the resort including tobogganing, cross country skiing, shoeshoeing, children’s snowboarding lessons, a flying fox, tube run and laser tag. In the warmer months mountain biking and bushwalks / boardwalks are popular.

I tried snowshoeing. It was $35 to hire poles, boots and snowshoes.

002

There is a bistro onsite open 9am-4pm, which serves a variety of hot takeaway style foods, such as pizza, fish n chips, chicken; as well as sandwiches, wraps, salads and baked goods. It gets very crowded, and its designed like a food hall, so not the best atmosphere to relax.

Interestingly there is not actually a lake. It is named after George Lake, who was the Surveyor-General of the area.

Lake Mountain Alpine Resort is at 1071 Lake Mountain Road, Marysville, Victoria. Check out the website for their carpark entry prices.

003

004

005

Fort Takapuna Historic Reserve

Fort Takapuna Historic Reserve is located at the head of the Rangitoto Channel in the Hauraki Gulf.

001

Fort Takapuna, was built between 1886 and 1889 as a military defence fort. It was designed by Major Tudor Boddam, a Royal Artillery Officer.

The fort originally housed two 6 inch disappearing guns and two quick firing Nordenfelt guns.

In 1926-27 the fort was converted into a storage for naval ammunition. The guns were removed and the gunpits roofed over to allow for extra storage. It was used for storage until 1936 when the new Naval Armament Depot was built at Kauri Point.

The brick building was were the soldiers lived. When it was first built there was a deep ditch around it. It has since been filled in and only the small part in front of the barracks remains.

002

003

004

Behind the barracks there was a series of underground tunnels and magazines.

The three concrete shelters were built in 1942 during the Second World War. These were designed to protect the gun crews. The guns originally came from HMS New Zealand (a First World War battlecruiser). By 1941 there were six guns mounted here, for at this battery, known as Left Battery and two at Right Battery, which has since been demolished.

Two of the guns were sent to Tonga, two were given to the Auckland War Memorial Museum, and the other two were scrapped.

005

006

007

An Anti-Submarine Fixed Defence Station was also built to house the electronic equipment used to detect enemy ships approaching. The building was altered following the war with its bay window removed.

Fort Takapuna is located on Vauxhall Road, next to Narrow Neck Beach.

008

009

010

011

Maungawhau (Mt Eden), Auckland

Maungawhau (Mt Eden) is a dormant volcano in Auckland city.

001

Its Māori language name Maungawhau means ‘mountain of the whau tree’. William Hobson, the first Governor of New Zealand, named the mountain and surrounding suburb after George Eden, 1st Earl of Auckland. 

The summit is 196 metres (643 feet) above sea level making it Auckland’s highest volcanic cone.

On a clear day the summit will provide views of the surrounding suburbs, Waitakere Ranges, the Sky Tower, Harbour Bridge and Rangitoto Island.

002

003

004

005

Its Māori language name Maungawhau means ‘mountain of the whau tree’. William Hobson, the first Governor of New Zealand named the mountain and surrounding suburb after George Eden, 1st Earl of Auckland.

The crater is 50 metres (160 feet) deep. The crater’s Māori name is Te Ipu Kai a Mataaho, which means Food Bowl of Mataaho. Mataaho was a deity that lived in the crater. The crater is sacred (tapu) so please be respectful and do not attempt to enter it.

In pre-European times Māori used the site as a pā (fortified settlement). You can still see remnants of the food storage pits.

Vehicle traffic to the summit is not permitted, except for people with limited mobility. It takes about 10 minutes to walk up from the carpark or bus stop. The climb is quite steep.

There is pedestrian access to the summit from Clive Road, Glenfell Place, Batger Road, Hillside Crescent, Rautangi Road and Owens Road.

The Mt Eden Road and Tahaki Drive entrances are open from 7am-8.30pm in summer and 7am to 7pm in winter. There is a lower carpark off Puhi Huia Road.

006

007

008

010