Rotokare Scenic Reserve

Rotokare Scenic Reserve is a bush and lake reserve in South Taranaki.

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Rotokare Scenic Reserve is a 230 hectare forested hill-country with extensive wetlands, native bush and a 17.8 hectare lake. It is managed by the Rotokare Scenic Reserve Trust.

The Lake Rotokare Walkway is a 4 km walking track that circles the lake. The first 600 metres feature boardwalks around the wetlands, which include a boardwalk out to a floating viewing pontoon.

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The boardwalk up until the pontoon is wheelchair accessible, and many visitors only walk as far as the pontoon and then return. The track after this can be muddy in winter. It should take approximately 1.5 to 2 hours to complete the loop walk.

The reserve is protected by a 8.2 km pest-proof fence. Entry is through a double set of gates. The gate has to close behind before you can open the next gate.

Entry is free but donations to the trust are appreciated.

Rotokare Scenic Reserve is at Sangster Road, 12 km from Eltham, South Taranaki.

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Lake Mangamahoe

Lake Mangamahoe is a 262ha commercial production forest with a scenic park and lake.

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Lake Mangamahoe is popular for mountain biking, walking and running. There are also horse treks.

In 1932 Lake Mangamahoe was created by forming a dam across the valley and submerging 79 acres. The lake is named after the Mangamahoe stream, which flows into the lake.

The Lake Circuit walk will take approximately 1 hour 45 minutes. There is also the Hydro Road Track walk, which is 30 minutes, and a short five minute walk to the Mt. Taranaki Lookout.

Lake Mangamahoe is 10 minutes south of New Plymouth on State Highway 3. Access from Lake Road, at Kent Road Junction. During daylights savings the gate is open 7am to 8:30pm. Outside of daylight savings hours it is open 7am to 6pm.

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Rabindra Sarobar Lake

Rabindra Sarobar Lake is a man-made lake in south Kolkata, India.

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The Calcutta Improvement Trust acquired 192 acres of marshy jungle to develop for residential use. The lake, which covers approximately 72 acres of the park space, was originally named Dhakuria Lake. In 1958, it was renamed after the writer and Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore. There is a statue of Tagore at southern entrance to the park.

Some of the trees and shrubs surrounding the lake are over 100 years old.

There has been issues in recent years with pollutions levels in the lake but it is still a nice walk.

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Lake Agnes Tea house

The Lake Agnes Tea house is an mountaintop tea house overlooking Lake Agnes, which serves over 100 varies of tea and other delicious goodies.

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The trail begins near Fairmont Chateau on the eastern shore of Lake Louise. It is a 3.6 kilometre (2.2 mile) hike to the teahouse. It takes most visitors between an hour and an hour and half to reach the tea house.

The forested trail will pass Mirror Lake (with the Big Beehive as its backdrop) and a small waterfall before reaching Lake Agnes and the tea house.

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Lake Agnes is named after the first prime minister of Canada’s second wife Lady Susan Agnes Macdonald.

The tea house, which has no electricity or running water, was built by Canadian Pacific Railway in 1901. It began serving tea in 1905. The original log building was replaced in 1981 and used the original windows in its design.

The tea house serves over 100 different varieties of tea. They also serve a selection of sandwiches, salads, soups, and baked goods (baked in the tea house’s propane oven).

It is open from early June to October (Canada Thanksgiving). Bring cash (US and Canadian dollars accepted).

From the tea house it is downhill to return to Lake Louise. For those wishing to go for a longer walk it is approximately 1 km to Little Beehive and 1.6 km to Big Beehive.

There is a second tea house – Plain of Six Glacier’s Tea House. This is approximately 5 kms from Lake Agnes. It is a full day hike to see both tea houses. The entire trip is around 14.5 km.

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Lake Louise

Lake Louise is a glacial lake in Banff National Park.

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The lake, which is about 2.5 kilometres (1.5 miles) long and 90 metres (295 feet) deep has a pretty emerald colour in the summer. This is caused by the light refracting off the rock flour, which is deposited into the lake by the glacial melt.

Lake Louise is named after Princess Louisa Caroline Alberta, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria, and the wife of Marquess of Lorne, the fourth Governor General of Canada.

The Stoney Nakota First Nations People named the lake Ho-Run-Num-Nay (Lake of the Little Fishes).

The Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise sits on the eastern shores of the lake. This hotel was opened by the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1911. My family had the buffet breakfast at Poppy Brassiere, the service and food were excellent.

Lake Louise is approximately 5 kilometres (3.1 miles) west of Lake Louise village.

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Bow Summit & Peyto Lake

The Bow Summit Lookout provides amazing views of the turquoise coloured Peyto Lake.

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At 2070 metres above sea level the Bow Summit is the highest point on the Icefields Parkway.

It is approximately 10 to 15 minutes walk from the carpark to a viewing platform overlooking Peyto Lake.

Peyto Lake gets its a strong turquoise colour from the glacier rock flour that flows into it during the summer months. The lake is named after William ‘Wild Bill’ Peyto, an early park warden of the Banff National Park.

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Consolation Lakes

Consolation Lakes are 3 kilometres southeast of Moraine Lake.

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This walk from Moraine Lake to Consolation Lakes begins at Moraine Lake carpark, near the Rockpile Trail. Click here to read my post on Moraine Lake and the Rockpile Trail.

At the beginning of the trail you will need to cross a rockpile at the bottom of the Tower of Babel. So sturdy footwear is needed. Also due to bear activity in the area hikers are required to travel in at least a group of four and close together.

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After this majority of the trail is in a forested area that follows the Babel Creek. When I walked in the summer there was some snow / icy sludge to cross between the rockpile and the start of the track in the forest.

Just before the Lower Consolation Lake the tracks opens to a large meadow and wetland area. Beyond this is a massive boulder field below Mount Babel. You will need to climb over the boulders to get a proper view of the lake

I turned around at the Lower Lake after climbing over the massive boulders. To reach the Upper Lake you will need to cross the Babel Creek and follow the eastern shoreline.

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Moraine Lake

Moraine Lake is a glacial lake in Banff National Park.

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The vehicle road to Lake Moraine has closed for the winter season and will reopen mid to late May 2018. This post is based around my visit during summer 2017.

The lake is 14 kilometres (8.7 miles) outside Lake Louise Village and located in the Valley on Ten Peaks.

Its famous blue-green colour is a result of light refracting off the fine particles of rock from the glacier run off, which flows into the lake. This vibrant colour usually peaks in late June.

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One of the walks I did was the Moraine Lakeshore Trail begins near the canoe docks. It is a relatively flat hike that follows the western edge of the lake through a forested area crossing several streams.

There is a boardwalk at the southern end of the lake where a stream flows from the Wenkchemna Glacier.

It is approximately 1.2 km one way and you return back the way you came.

The more popular and shorter walk is the Rockpile Trail, which provides amazing views over the lake. The track is approximately 300 metres.

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Lake Minnewanka

Lake Minnewanka is a glacial lake in Banff National Park.

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The lake, which is approximately 5 km (3 miles) from Banff township is 21 km (13 miles) long and 142 metres (466 feet) deep.

It is the longest lake in the Canadian Rockies region. The lake’s main fed is from Cascade Mountain via the Cascade River. There is also fed from Mount Inglismaldie, Mount Girouard and Mount Peechee.

The Stony Nakoda people called the lake Mini-Waka (Water of Spirits) after the spirits that reside in the lake. The early European settlers named it Devil’s Lake.

The area is popular for picnicking, hiking, mountain biking, scuba diving, and boating. It is the only lake in the Banff National Park that allows use of motorized boats.

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Hamilton Lake

Lake Rotoroa (meaning long lake), more commonly known as Hamilton Lake, at 54 hectares is the largest of three lakes in the Hamilton city area.

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Hamilton Lake Domain

There is a 3.8km pathway the circles that lake. It is an easy 45 minute to an hour stroll around the lake. The flat path is well maintained with a paved path and wooden boardwalks, so is suitable for all levels of fitness.

It is a lovely walk. There is plenty to see with ducks, swans and pukekos frolicking on and around the lake. And if you choose a nice day it can be quite magical as the sun or shadows hit the water.

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Pukeko playing in the flax

On the eastern side of the lake there is The Verandah, a cafe and function rooms. I had an apricot chocolate fudge slice and a cold drink, which was a nice end to the walk.

Nearby the cafe there is a children’s playground and picnic area. There is also short bush walks and a golf green on the west side of the lake.

Swings by the lake

Swings by the lake

Children can climb aboard the train opposite the Cafe

Children can climb aboard the train next to the Cafe

Lake Rotoroa is not safe for swimming. Earlier this year tests confirmed that toxic algae had reappeared and the Council advises parents to keep their children away from the water’s edge.

Sadly the Hamilton Lake Domain has had some bad press lately. In May this year a woman was indecently assaulted in the reserve and last month a 15 year-old girl was raped at knife-point. With this blog I do prefer to focus on the positive rather than the negative, but when exploring what this wonderful country has to offer one does have to remember like all places it has a dark side too. So please stay alert and be safe.

 

Hamilton Lake Domain
Vehicle and pedestrian entrance off Ruakiwi Road