Healesville Sanctuary, Australia

Healesville Sanctuary is a zoo specialising in native Australian animals.

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Dr Colin McKenzie set up the Institute of Anatomical Research in 1920 on 78 acres (32 hectares of land. The reserve was passed to the Healesville Council in 1927 and was named the Sir Colin McKenzie Sanctuary in 1934 (McKenzie was knighted in 1929).

Today the sanctuary is part of Zoos Victoria, which includes Melbourne Zoo and Werribee Open Range Zoo. It is well known for its work saving endangered Australian species.

The zoo is set in a natural bushland environment with over 200 species of Australian animals. The zoo is split up into a series of different areas / tracks to explore.

The main track is home to reptiles, amphibians, birds of prey, parrots, and emus. There are also several sites of Aboriginal cultural significance to the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation. There is also the Flight Arena, where there is a daily bird show and the Australian Wildlife Centre, that treats more than 1500 sick and injured native animals a year.

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Spirts of Sky – Bird Show

The woodlands track includes emu, wallaby, barn owl, Australian pelicans, kookaburra, Tasmanian Devil. Also here is Animals of the Night, a facility that houses nocturnal animals, such as possums, bilbies, bandicoots and gliders.

The wetlands track is home to native wetland birds and frogs, such as the black swan, which originated from the Southern Hemisphere.

There is also Dingo County, Kangaroo County (Kangaroo Island Kangaroos, Red Kangaroos and Wombats), Koala Forest (Southern Koala and short-beaked echidna), and the Platypus Track.

Healesville Sanctuary is approximately one hour from Melbourne. The address is Badger Creek Road, Healesville, Victoria.

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Dingo

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Kangaroo County

Puffing Billy Railway, Australia

The Puffing Billy Railway is a heritage steam railway in the Dandenong Ranges in Victoria, Australia.

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The steam train runs on the historic 24 kilometre (15 miles) track between Belgrave and Gembrook through the Dandenong Ranges. This is one of four narrow gauge lines that opened in the 1900s to provide transport and access to remote parts of Victoria.

In 1954 the line closed due operating costs. The Puffing Billy Preservation Society was formed and reopened the line between Belgrave and Menzies Creek in 1962. Later the line was reopened to Emerald in 1965, Lakeside in 1975, and Gembrook in 1998.

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Majority of passengers will start their journey at Belgrave, but it is also possible to start at Lakeside. Usually there a four departures a day from Belgrave.

From Belgrave it is 30 minutes one-way to Menzies Creek, 50 minutes to Emerald, 60 minutes to Lakeside, 1 hour and 50 minutes to Gembrook. A return journey from Belgrave to Gembrooke is approximately 5 hours. Please visit their website for more information on journey timings.

The carriages are open-sided providing views of mountain ash trees, forests and fern gullies as it travels through the Dandenong Ranges National Park.

The service operates everyday except Christmas Day. Belgrave Station is located at 1 Old Monbulk Road, Belgrave, Victoria. Please visit the website for information on parking.

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Grants Picnic Ground, Dandenongs, Australia

Grants Picnic Ground is located in the Sherbrooke Forest in the Dandenong Ranges National Park.

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Grants Picnic Ground is known for its picnic grounds, bush walks, and bird feeding (due to cease February 2020).

Grants on Sherbrooke is a locally-owned and run tearooms and souvenir shop located in the grounds. You can purchase tokens here to access the bird feeding area.

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The fenced bird feeding area is the only spot currently in the Dandenong Ranges were hand feeding native birds is permitted. Bird feeding at Grants Picnic Ground is due to be discontinued in February 2020.

In the past there was the opportunity to feed colourful lorikeets and king parrots. The sulphur-crested cockatoo has in recent years pushed the smaller birds out.

 

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Nearby is the Margaret Lester Forest Walk. This short 500 metre, 15 minute loop track has been designed with a hardsurfaced track to allow those with prams or limited mobility enjoy the forest.

The sealed track was constructed in 1981, the International Year of Disabled Persons. It was first of its kind in Victoria. Margaret Lester was a paraplegic and architecture graduate advised in its design.

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There is also the Hardy Gully Nature Walk (700 m | 45 min loop) and the Eastern Sherbrooke Forest Walk (7.1 km | 2 hour loop), which both start from the Picnic Grounds.

Facilities wise there are several picnic tables and electric BBQs dotted around the reserve, including a covered pavilion with four picnic tables.

Grants Picnic Ground and Grants on Sherbrooke are located at 70 Monbulk Road, Kallist, Victoria.

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Lake Mountain Alpine Resort, Victoria, Australia

Lake Mountain Alpine Resort is a mountain and ski resort in Victoria, Australia.

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The Lake Mountain Alpine Resort is situated between Lake Mountain and Echo Flat, and is provides access to the Yarra Ranges National Park. The mountain is 1,433 metres (4,701 feet) high.

This ski resort is approximately 120 kilometres (75 miles) from Melbourne. As it is the closest snow resort from Melbourne it is a popular day trip for snow play, particularly for families.

There are many activities to partake at the resort including tobogganing, cross country skiing, shoeshoeing, children’s snowboarding lessons, a flying fox, tube run and laser tag. In the warmer months mountain biking and bushwalks / boardwalks are popular.

I tried snowshoeing. It was $35 to hire poles, boots and snowshoes.

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There is a bistro onsite open 9am-4pm, which serves a variety of hot takeaway style foods, such as pizza, fish n chips, chicken; as well as sandwiches, wraps, salads and baked goods. It gets very crowded, and its designed like a food hall, so not the best atmosphere to relax.

Interestingly there is not actually a lake. It is named after George Lake, who was the Surveyor-General of the area.

Lake Mountain Alpine Resort is at 1071 Lake Mountain Road, Marysville, Victoria. Check out the website for their carpark entry prices.

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Ulumbarra Theatre Bendigo

The Ulumbarra Theatre is a performing arts complex in Bendigo, Victoria that is housed in the old Sandhurst Gaol.

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I visited as part of the Sandhurst Gaol Tour. Tours are on Tuesdays at 11am and Saturdays at 2pm. Bookings are essential, book online or through the Bendigo Visitor Centre.

The Sandhurst Gaol opened in 1863. It was designed around the pentonville prison model where the wings radiate from a central tower. It operated as a prison until the First World War when it was used as a military detention centre. It later operated as the HM Bendigo Training Prison from 1954 until its closure in 2006.

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In June 2013 work began on the 25.8 million dollar project to transform the historic prison into a state-of-the-art theatre complex.  The theatre officially opened on 17th April 2015. It is amazing how they have combined the historic walls of the prison with modern architecture.

The Ulumbarra Theatre includes a 950-seat theatre, music, drama and dance studios, and a commercial learning kitchen. Students from Bendigo Senior Secondary College use the facilities including the kitchen for hospitality classes and other areas for performing arts classes.

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The word ulumbarra (pronounced u-lum-ba-ra) means gather together or meeting place in the language of the Dja Dja Wurrung people.

The theatre is located at 10 Gaol Road, Bendigo, between the Bendigo Senior Secondary College and the Tom Flood Sports Centre.

Bendigo Joss House Temple

Bendigo Joss House Temple is a Chinese place of worship located in north Bendigo, approximately 150 km (93 miles) north west of Melbourne.

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The temple is located on Finn Street. It is open everyday from 11am-3pm. Adults are $6, concession $5, child $4, family $18. Combined tickets with the Vintage ‘Talking’ Tram can be purchased. If taking the tram, disembark at Joss House Temple stop and follow the red footpath.

It is believed that the Joss House was built in the 1870s for the Chinese Masonic Society. The temple is one of seven that was built to serve the Chinese miners who moved to Bendigo during the goldrush. It is the only surviving temple in Victoria from the goldrush period.

The complex contained a caretaker’s residence, Temple and Ancestral Hall. The building is made from handmade painted red bricks. The red symbolises happiness, strength and vitality.

The temple is dedicated to Guan-Di (Kwan Gong), who was the god of war and prosperity.

After purchasing tickets a volunteer guide will show visitors around the temple explaining the history of the temple, Chinese culture and the Chinese people’s connection with Bendigo and the goldfields.

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